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How Much Do Chiropractors Make?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that chiropractors make a median annual income of $70,720 as of May 2020 or $34.00 per hour.The lowest 10 percent of chiropractors earned less than $35,390, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $137,950.

Do Chiropractors Get Paid Well?

Chiropractors are paid well—they earn more than the average worker in their industry as well as the country. The average salary, according to the BLS, for chiropractors, $70,720 per year, which is slightly more (1.2%) than the average salary for all health care professionals, $69,870 per year. Chiropractors make 67% more than the average salary for all professions, $41,950.

How Much Do Chiropractors Get Paid Starting Out?

The BLS does not provide average compensation data for entry-level positions for chiropractors just starting out, but the bottom 25% of chiropractors earn $53,070 each year according to the BLS.

How Many Chiropractors Are There In The United States?

In 2020, there were 51,400 chiropractors in the United States. The states with the most chiropractors are Florida (3,120), California (2,670) and Texas (2,660). New York (1,740), Chicago (1,380) and Minneapolis (1,080) are the metropolitan areas with the highest employment level of chiropractors

Where can chiropractors earn the most?

Chiropractic salaries depend on location and work setting. According to the BLS, chiropractors earn the most in the following industries: Management, Scientific, and Technical Consulting Services, Outpatient Centers and Other Ambulatory Health Care Services. The metropolitan areas with the highest average chiropractor salaries are Spokane, Raleigh and New Orleans.

Is Going to Chiropractic School Worth It?

Deciding whether or not to become a chiropractor depends on a number of factors such as job growth, salary information, job requirements and required education. As a chiropractor, you can expect demand for your services—employment for chiropractors is growing 11% between 2020 and 2030. This growth will result in 1,800 new chiropractor jobs per year. The growth in chiropractor jobs is faster than the projected growth for all jobs (8%), but slower than the projected growth for health care jobs (12%). By 2030, the BLS projects that there will be 57,000 chiropractors in the United States.

Becoming a chiropractor can be a long journey. Chiropractors must first earn a college degree before studying for a Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) degree, which takes four years. In total, it can take seven to eight years after high school to become a chiropractor. Even after graduating with a D.C., chiropractors typically need to maintain an active license with their state chiropractic board.  

Finally, you should consider whether you’re interested in a chiropractor’s day-to-day duties. Chiropractors evaluate and treat patients who have health problems of the neuromusculoskeletal system. In addition to working with patients, chiropractors must maintain patient records. And since many chiropractors are solo practitioners, many chiropractors are also small business owners—they often must spend time marketing and managing their practices.

To search for chiropractic job listings and view job descriptions in your area, you can view HealthJob’s chiropractor job board.

How Much Do Chiropractors Earn In Each State?

The table below compares chiropractor salaries across states and U.S. territories (Source: BLS Occupational Employment and Wages May 2020). You can also find data for the number of chiropractors in each state as well as the number of chiropractors per 1,000 jobs—a figure that can help you determine the job's popularity in a given location. Not all locations have salary and employment statistics.

Chiropractor Salary
Location
Annual Salary
in location
Employment
In location
Employment per 1,000 jobs
Hawaii
$95,690
80
0.134
Washington
$92,420
730
0.228
Minnesota
$92,050
1370
0.506
Delaware
$89,860
130
0.298
New Jersey
$87,010
700
0.186
Massachusetts
$86,170
570
0.170
Mississippi
$82,720
140
0.126
Alaska
$81,320
130
0.446
Maryland
$79,170
580
0.231
Texas
$79,010
2660
0.219
New York
$78,550
1660
0.191
Wisconsin
$78,540
980
0.362
Maine
$77,710
210
0.369
Oklahoma
$77,480
450
0.288
Connecticut
$77,120
240
0.153
Ohio
$76,750
1290
0.251
West Virginia
$76,730
70
0.103
Louisiana
$76,470
290
0.160
North Dakota
$75,020
260
0.649
New Hampshire
$73,840
130
0.211
Virginia
$73,810
780
0.212
Alabama
$73,770
290
0.154
Wyoming
$73,470
90
0.360
Florida
$73,000
3120
0.370
Arizona
$71,840
660
0.232
Pennsylvania
$71,080
1390
0.252
Oregon
$70,760
760
0.423
Nebraska
$70,030
530
0.566
South Dakota
$69,460
190
0.454
Rhode Island
$68,870
110
0.253
North Carolina
$68,790
1000
0.232
California
$64,810
2670
0.163
Indiana
$64,760
810
0.277
Illinois
$64,710
1950
0.346
Missouri
$64,300
800
0.298
South Carolina
$63,300
460
0.226
Nevada
$63,290
430
0.344
Vermont
$62,950
70
0.232
Georgia
$60,850
960
0.223
Idaho
$60,700
260
0.366
Michigan
$59,980
940
0.238
Colorado
$58,790
720
0.279
Iowa
$57,730
790
0.538
New Mexico
$54,440
140
0.172
Puerto Rico
$52,140
70
0.089
Kansas
$51,940
510
0.383
Kentucky
$48,450
360
0.205
Tennessee
$47,790
460
0.158
Montana
$47,150
260
0.564
Arkansas
$45,430
210
0.174
Utah
$40,180
380
0.258