How Much Do Nurse Anesthetists Make? (2023)

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How Much Money Do Nurse Anesthetists Make?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that nurse anesthetists make a median salary of $195,610 each year or $94.04 per hour. The bottom 10 percent of nurse anesthetists earn less than $131,840 per year, while the top 10 percent of nurse anesthetists earn more than $ annually.

Do Nurse Anesthetists Get Paid Well?

Nurses anesthetists are paid well—the median salary for nurse anesthetists is more than four times the national average ($45,760) for all workers. They also earn more than other health care professionals. The median salary for healthcare practitioners and technical occupations is $75,040. Nurse Anesthetists typically have a master's degree. And when compared to professions that require a similar level of education, nurse anesthetists earn more. Other professions that require a master's degree have a median salary of $77,750 per year.

How Much Do Nurse Anesthetists Get Starting Out?

The BLS does not provide average compensation data for entry-level positions for nurse anesthetists just starting out, but the bottom 25 percent of nurse anesthetists earn $164,860 each year.

How Many Nurse Anesthetists Are There in the United States?

There are 45,200 nurse anesthetists in the U.S.The states with the most nurse anesthetists are Texas (3,920), Florida (3,310) and Minnesota (2,890). 

Where Can Nurse Anesthetists Earn The Most?

The states where CRNAs earn the most are Connecticut ($276,540), New Jersey and Illinois. The BLS also notes that CRNAs in Alaska earn more than $208,000 per year, but they do not have an exact figure. 

Is Becoming A Nurse Anesthetist Worth It?

Deciding whether or not to become a CRNA depends on a number of factors such as job growth, salary information, job requirements and required education. As a CRNA, you can expect strong demand for your services—employment for CRNAs is expected to grow by 11.8 percent between 2021 and 2031. This growth will result in approximately  2,900 new jobs per year.

In terms of salary, CRNAs are among the highest paid nurses, with a median annual wage of over $174,000 as of 2021. However, becoming a CRNA requires a significant amount of education and training. To become a CRNA, you must first become a registered nurse (RN) and then complete a Master's degree program in nurse anesthesia. These programs typically take about 2-3 years to complete and include both classroom instruction and clinical experience.

As a CRNA, you will be responsible for administering anesthesia to patients during surgical and other medical procedures. This includes evaluating patients, determining the appropriate type and dosage of anesthesia, and monitoring patients during the procedure. CRNAs work closely with anesthesiologists and other healthcare professionals to provide safe and effective anesthesia care to patients. CRNAs may work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, surgery centers, and clinics.

Overall, becoming a CRNA can be a rewarding career choice for those who are interested in the field of anesthesia and are willing to commit to the necessary education and training. It offers strong job growth and a high salary, but it also requires a significant investment in terms of time and resources.

Certfied Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA) Salary
Location
Annual Salary
in location
Employment
In location
Employment per 1,000 jobs
Nevada
-
70
0.056
Delaware
-
70
0.168
Oregon
-
260
0.142
Wyoming
-
50
0.179
California
-
1710
0.104
Wisconsin
-
960
0.353
Puerto Rico
$56,210
290
0.357
Minnesota
$207,180
1300
0.479
Montana
$205,890
60
0.127
Michigan
$202,250
2420
0.616
New York
$200,090
1920
0.221
Connecticut
$199,930
-
-
Hawaii
$197,180
-
-
North Dakota
$195,920
230
0.575
Maine
$195,480
300
0.514
Maryland
$195,250
460
0.182
Illinois
$194,980
1460
0.260
Washington
$192,690
660
0.208
Iowa
$192,200
380
0.255
South Dakota
$192,000
360
0.865
New Jersey
$191,800
800
0.211
West Virginia
$191,240
670
1.034
Nebraska
$187,820
470
0.498
Massachusetts
$187,080
400
0.119
New Hampshire
$186,770
190
0.312
North Carolina
$182,500
2790
0.650
Pennsylvania
$182,190
2160
0.391
Georgia
$181,520
560
0.130
Texas
$180,580
2960
0.245
Oklahoma
$179,360
350
0.224
Colorado
$178,870
370
0.145
Arizona
$178,460
80
0.030
Missouri
$177,640
770
0.286
Vermont
$175,860
70
0.249
South Carolina
$175,710
1290
0.641
Virginia
$175,170
1120
0.303
Ohio
$174,600
2880
0.560
Tennessee
$174,550
1830
0.630
Mississippi
$172,220
270
0.255
New Mexico
$169,310
210
0.264
Louisiana
$163,350
820
0.458
Indiana
$162,240
630
0.214
Kentucky
$160,400
600
0.335
Alabama
$159,970
1410
0.743
Florida
$158,620
3660
0.433
Kansas
$157,840
740
0.553
Idaho
$153,110
210
0.293
Arkansas
$133,810
-
-
Utah
$117,100
30
0.023